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Archive for June 1st, 2009

Satori talks about her Dunkleosteus fish. We mispronounced his name, it’s dunk-lee-OH-stee-us. He was an armored fish (head covered with bony plates), which is a placoderm (now extinct) type of fish, living in the Devonian period.

I love it when we can combine learning different things in a lesson designed like a game! Here we practiced our animal classification, now a total no-brainer for Satori. Plus we got our first exposure to charts and graphs! Throw a little bit of math in, and I feel our day has been complete. 🙂

While I was updating our last blog post, I asked Satori to gather all her small plastic animal toys and put them in a box. Then we printed this Animal Classification Graph out from Ami at Homeschool share.

Animal Classification Graph

Animal Classification Graph

We put in our own color labels next to each animal. I would’ve drawn the animal, but Satori can sound things out good enough to know what each column is. Then she closed her eyes, and picked her first animal! It was a reptile, so we colored the first column in green.

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I was very pleased that as Satori randomly picked animals from the living room, she actually picked a very balanced animal set of reptiles, amphibians, mammals, fish and birds! These animals consisted mostly of our Galapagos and Rainforest Animal Toobs, with a couple of random creatures thrown in.

You can’t see the lighter-colored columns, but this was a close race…

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Who was going to win?

Animal race

Animal race

And it was the mammals! What a fun way to wrap up the afternoon.

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Introducing our Dunkleosteus! 33 feet long, and weighing 4 tons, you wouldn’t want to be swimming the water with him! This prehistoric fish had the strongest jaws and bite of any animal who has ever lived.  Living 400 million years ago, in the Devonian period, Dunkle (our nickname for him) was a placoderm fish and is luckily, now extinct.

Dunkleosteus

Dunkleosteus

We set him in this sandy sea, and he immediately set about devouring an entire shark!

Dunkleosteus eating a shark

Dunkleosteus eating a shark

Move over trilobites, Dunkle is our latest fave prehistoric monster.

Yes, we’ve moved on from the early paleozoic to the late paleozoic, where we’ll spend a week or two of our time before we hit DINOSAURS! You may notice I added our next few Prehistory lessons to our curriculum. We’re having soooo much fun!