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Archive for June 12th, 2009

After I discovered the Kaiyodo Dinotale Chocosaurs, a week later, our prehistoric creatures came creeping in. I’ll introduce them, according to “age”.

ORDOVICIAN

Our Triarthrus trilobite… Out of the 15 thousand species of trilobites, this is the one most commonly used in science texts displaying trilobite physiology.

Triarthrus trilobite

Triarthrus trilobite

SILURIAN

Our Pterygotus, a sea scorpion (eurypterid), that can grow 7 feet long.

Pterygotus

Pterygotus

DEVONIAN “age of fishes”

Cute little Hemicyclaspsis (closely related to Cephalaspis as seen in Walking with Monsters) is a jawless fish. She had a heavily armored, shovel-shaped headshield

Hemicyclaspis - jawless fish
Hemicyclaspis – jawless fish

And lastly…

PERMIAN
Diplocaulus, the strange looking amphibian with the boomerang-shaped head!

Diplocaulus

Diplocaulus

 

Here they all are, getting together for a prehistoric party. More to come next week! I know you’re looking forward to it. 😛

Prehistoric party!

Prehistoric party!

There have been hundreds of little things I’ve learned the past few months, and realizing that Dimetrodon is not a dino is one. The Dimetrodon is actually an ancestor of mammals in fact! Having both reptile and mammal characteristics, he was one of the first creatures to be able to somewhat control body temperature, using his sail. Living in the Permian period, right before the dinosaurs, he was a carnivore. Other sail-backed reptiles include the Edaphosaurus, an herbivore.

Satori understood his nature quickly, but I couldn’t resist drawing out the scenario and having her place Dimetrodon accordingly. We actually had a Dimetrodon toy in our house, I probably bought it thinking he was a dino, hehe. Still a reptile, Dimetrodon is cold-blooded. Luckily, he’s got these sails on his back that come in very handy. In the morning, all creatures are very sluggish and have to warm up before they can move. Here  our Dimetrodon is basking in the morning sun, his sails turned towards the sun’s warmth to warm his body up quickly.

Dimetrodon basking his sails in morning sun

Dimetrodon basking his sails in morning sun

Soon, he’s all ready and raring to go and starts chomping on an Edaphosaurus, his vegetarian, sail-backed cousin! His sharp teeth are in two sizes, which is why he’s named “Dimetrodon”, meaning two-teeth. As the sun rises high in the sky, it gets very hot. Dimetrodon simply points his sails away from the sun so very little surface area is shown. In this way, he controls his body temperature and cools off!

Cooling off in the mid-day sun

Cooling off in the mid-day sun