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Tag: dinosaurs

Just got back from this spectacular show tonight in Denver – Walking With Dinosaurs!

Here’s one pic before we head to bed:

Mama and Baby Brachiosaur

Mama and Baby Brachiosaur

We had these dinosaur bone kits lying around, so today we finally put them together. We are so close to our dinosaur studies that things are overlapping and I thought it would be fun to do some dino activities today.

There’s 4 total in this collection, here we just have Brachiosaurus and Stegosaurus.

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No sooner than we I had this brachiosaurus put together, when someone stuffed some leaves in his mouth! (We often have to stop to feed her plant eating animals grass and leaves.)

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Both skeletons have movable jaws so the plant leaves stay!

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Also, an update on our caterpillars, they have moved up to the top and formed their cocoon. I’ve moved the chrysalis to their butterfly habitat and now we just wait for them to emerge!

Here they are in their cup they came in. It got quite dirty with lots of caterpillar poop and silk stuff.

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The past few days we’ve been studying fossils and often came across the term “sediment”.

Solid fragmented material, such as silt, sand, gravel, chemical precipitates, and fossil fragments, that is transported and deposited by water, ice, or wind or that accumulates through chemical precipitation or secretion by organisms, and that forms layers on the Earth’s surface.

I figured out a cool activity to demonstrate the sediment process. First I collected different “sediment layers” around the house, such as flour, rice, kool-aid powder, sugar, cous-cous, chia seeds, spices, kidney beans, etc…  Have a jar ready, and if you want, some dino or animals to bury. I had Satori and David organize the granules from coarseness to fineness of the grains, which was a fun learning activity in itself, as we peered at the grains with a microscope and held separate pieces in our hands.

To-be-sediment-layers

To-be-sediment-layers

Then we chose 2 dinosaur fossils and set them on the finest layer, the flour. This needn’t be done, as the dinos never showed up in our jar anyway.

Dino skeletons on the ground

Dino skeletons on the ground

Then pour over the sediment layers over the fossils (finest goes first so it stays on the bottom) and the result is a colorful display of sediment!

Sedimentary "rock" layers

Sedimentary "rock" layers

Satori has always loved dinosaurs, and as we near our highly anticipated dinosaur studies, she’s been playing with her dinosaur figurines a lot. And mama, ever the research geek, finds lots of niche sites dedicated to… dinosaur toys! People share their photos of their dinosaurs, their dino dioramas, and more. I thought I’d quickly try my hand at a few dino photos.

I came across this lovely Triceratops hanging out among some boulders.

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A few moments later, her little baby triceratops runs to her side!

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Later on, the colorful daddy makes his presence…

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Earlier this week while we were hanging out in St. George, Utah, Satori woke up and wanted to see dinosaur tracks and fossils. We had mentioned in passing that we might see some on our trip, although I had no clue yet where. Luckily, this town had a great site!

Dinosaur Discovery at Johnson Farm

Dinosaur Discovery at Johnson Farm

St. George Dinosaur Discovery Site at Johnson Farm websites:

Featured in a recent National Geographic, this place allows you to walk along an early Jurassic lake (165-198 million years ago), viewing dinosaur tracks, swim tracks and more that are some of the best preserved in the world.

David examining the large footprint of a possible T-rex

David examining the large footprint of a possible T-rex

Vivid colorful pictures of feathery dinosaurs gave us a different view of what we’re used to seeing dinosaurs look like.

Feathery dinos

Feathery dinos

Checking out a pair of dino eggs.

Dinosaur eggs

Dinosaur eggs

Baby dino replica

Baby dino replica

One of Satori’s favorite activities – a dino dig!

Digging for fossils

Digging for fossils

We will be revisiting dinosaurs in a few of our prehistory lessons.

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